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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 crm real estate agent


PeopleSoft Gathers Manufacturing and SCM Wherewithal Part Two: Market Impact
The PeopleSoft-J.D. Edwards merger was, in great part, about retaining the big five (or big four, or big three) seat and the need to be bigger within shrinking

crm real estate agent  its base in stand-alone CRM applications. PeopleSoft had even developed around thirty individual applications within the realm of SCM and manufacturing, and the supply chain product modules can be combined in several ways for different sectors and their requirements. For example, a manufacturing suite with configurable product and process design suitable for repetitive and assemble-to-order (ATO) discrete manufacturing was developed (however, it had no functionality for complex discrete and process

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

CRM for Financial and Insurance Markets

Customer relationship management (CRM) focuses on the retention of customers by collecting data from all customer interactions with a company from all access points (by phone, mail, or Web, or in the field). The company can then use this data for specific business purposes by taking a customer-centric rather than a product-centric approach. CRM applications are front-end tools designed to facilitate the capture, consolidation, analysis, and enterprise-wide dissemination of data from existing and potential customers. This process occurs throughout the marketing, sales, and service stages, with the objective of better understanding one’s customers and anticipating their interest in an enterprise’s products or services.  

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Turn the Internet into a Strategic Sales and Interaction Channel


With the emergence of the Internet, the business environment has changed for many organizations, and will change to an even greater extent in the future. Indeed, in an increasingly dynamic and global environment, the Web has become an important source of competitive differentiation for companies of all sizes. In this comprehensive white paper, you’ll find out how to design a Web channel strategy that works for you.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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J.D. Edwards Finds Its Inner-Self Within Its 5th Incarnation Part 3: Market Impact


In a nutshell, J.D. Edwards seems poised to deliver applications within its traditional verticals that are wide-ranging, integrated, and modular (loosely decoupled) at the same time, which is apparently a clearer message and a better business model for the company. With a new management team the company seems to have found its soul, as it has finally pinpointed the right offering for its target market (both geography, customer size, and vertical segments wise), and it also seems to be exuding an air of confidence without arrogance, which had rarely, if ever, been seen in the past.

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17 Rules of the Road for Customer Relationship Management


Customer relationship management (CRM) is more than a product—it’s a philosophy. That’s why, when it comes to CRM systems, it’s important to understand all the benefits of an integrated application before beginning the selection process. After all, just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, a CRM solution is only as good as its implementation.

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CRM Selections: When An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure Part One: The CRM Selection Challenge


Two of the greatest challenges IT decision makers face when selecting a CRM package is first, having a comprehensive understanding of their functional and technical requirements and second, identifying the vendors that best match their requirements. This article will focus on determining the functionality and technology required to enable business processes, and how to compare vendor offerings once those requirements have been documented.

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8 Essential CRM Best Practices-an Executive Guide


In this informative white paper, 8 essential CRM best practicesan executive guide, you'll discover the eight key elements of highly successful CRM ...

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2011 Customer Relationship Management Buyer's Guide: Innovations in CRM


Customer relationship management (CRM) has matured, and offers more choices than ever before. This buyer’s guide reviews the latest innovations in this software space, focusing on cloud, mobile, and social options, and includes a section on the range of customer-centric and process-oriented add-ons and applications available. The guide also includes valuable CRM resources, case studies, and a directory of CRM vendors.

This buyer’s guide will show what CRM vendors are doing to differentiate themselves from the competition through innovation. We will first describe some of the major innovations in the CRM space (e.g., cloud computing, social media and collaboration tools, mobile technology, and extended functionality), and then review their advantages and disadvantages. For each category of innovation, the guide will illustrate with real- life examples how CRM vendors provide innovative solutions to their customers and the associated benefits.

Innovation in the CRM world can be approached from two main perspectives: innovations in software, which affect the way companies manage their relationships with their customers (e.g., the ability to analyze customer feedback, for better customer service and even product development), and innovations in the market, which affect the accessibility and usability of CRM solutions (e.g., having CRM functionality available in the cloud or on a mobile device). And as the two qualities are interconnected (innovation in one arena generally leads or responds to innovation in the other), this guide focuses equally on innovations in CRM software and in new delivery models, such as cloud computing and mobile.

Throughout this guide, we consider CRM to be more than a set of tools and solutions that companies use to facilitate their interactions with customers. A complete CRM implementation includes strategies and best practices that companies define and apply in order to attract and retain customers.


Table of Contents


Preface

Customer Relationship Management: A Buyer’s Guide

TEC CRM Resources

Casebook

KANA Software Customer Success Story
Yahoo! Listens Proactively to Customers to Deliver Good Experiences

1C-Rarus Customer Success Story
1C:Enterprise 8 Implementation for Gazprom Neft–Tyumen

HarrisData Customer Success Story
Leading Manufacturer Employs RTI Software’s Closed Loop CRM to Manage Its Nationwide Customer Service Initiative

Infinity Info Systems Customer Success Story
Infinity Info Systems Streamlines Workflow for Leading Wealth Management Firm Halbert Hargrove

Microsoft Dynamics CRM Customer Success Story
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Gives BioMedix Vascular Solutions Better Insight into Business Execution

Microsoft Dynamics CRM Customer Success Story by Ignify
Microsoft Dynamics CRM Gives Foreign Currency Exchange Company a 360-degree View of Customers and Business Operations

SugarCRM Customer Success Story
USA FACT Drives Higher Revenues with Sugar ProfessionalTM and Empowers Sales On-the-go with Sugar MobileTM


Vendor Directory

SAP Special Report


Download the full copy of the TEC 2011 CRM Buyer’s Guide for large enterprises and SMBs.



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CRM Innovations


BI for Large Enterprises

CRM innovations can be classified into four major categories: cloud computing, mobile, social, and extended functionality. Each category uses different technologies to address the needs of customer-focused companies and respond to changes in customer behavior. Many vendors innovate in two or more of these categories; others focus on one category (e.g., some traditional CRM vendors do not yet offer a cloud-computing delivery model or social functionality, but they have created strong mobile versions of their solutions).

Most of the innovative initiatives in the CRM space are contained within these four categories (but innovations are by no means limited to these categories). We consider these categories to be of the utmost importance—and this guide will focus on them— because they greatly affect the way companies manage their relationships with customers (existing or potential).



Download the full copy of the TEC 2011 CRM Buyer’s Guide for large enterprises and SMBs.

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Not Yet Real Time


Most global companies know their cash positions in real time, but fewer have other types of information at the ready. Get the details in this infographic from a report titled “Making the Real-Time Enterprise a Reality” provided by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services.

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Besieged By The CRM Throne Aspirants, King Siebel Delivers "The Magic No.7" Part 2: Market Impact


Will the long awaited Siebel 7 product release help the until recently undisputed CRM leader withstand the pressure from ERP giants – SAP, Oracle and PeopleSoft?

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CRM Selections: When An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure Part Two: Using A Knowledge Base To Reduce The Time, Risk And Cost Of A CRM Selection


Using a knowledge base in the selection process can reduce the time, risk and cost of procuring technology. Well constructed knowledge bases that are used in a tested selection methodology reduce the RFI process from months to weeks, eliminate data quality issues and allow an apples to apples comparison of vendor offerings.

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